Friday, December 31, 2010

Happy New Years

Surround yourself with people who love you in 2011.....

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Where Is The Love? - Black Eyed Peas (Barkworks & Puppy Mill Protest)

Wayne Pacelle Speaks Out.....

December 30, 2010
1,000 Reasons to Celebrate
We’ve reached a milestone here at HSUS. In 2008 we launched our Puppy Friendly Pet Stores program – to encourage pet-shop retailers to make it their corporate policy not to sell puppies and to educate interested customers about how to get a puppy from a shelter or reputable breeder instead. Some years ago, PetSmart and Petco – the two largest retailers in the sector – took the lead in shunning the sale of dogs. They realized they didn’t need to sell dogs and cats to make a profit, and they showed a new way.

Following their lead, HSUS launched a campaign to have the entire industry embrace this business model, and grassroots advocates joined in. I am pleased to say we just signed on our 1,000th Puppy Friendly Pet Store – an accomplishment that I thought would be months or even a year ahead. When a store signs our Puppy-Friendly Pet Store pledge, it promises not to sell puppies. Each store also receives a sign proclaiming, "We love puppies; that's why we don't sell them," to display in the store and free materials for their customers about how to adopt or find a pet from a humane source.

Please join me in making a New Year's resolution to shop only at pet stores and Internet sites that don’t sell puppies, such as our Puppy-Friendly Pet Stores, which can be found in more than 40 states. Look up your local puppy friendly pet stores by state at humanesociety.org/puppystores. You can also email us at stop-puppy-mills@humanesociety.org and we’ll be in touch with you about how you can help expand this important program.

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

A Christmas Shelter Dog's Poem

As you gather this holiday season to spend time with friends and family and your own beloved furry family members, take just a moment to think of those dogs and cats who sit alone and unwanted, with just the barest of necessities.
Gather up some old blankets and towels, maybe grab an extra bag of treats or food or a few toys when you’re out shopping and take that few extra minutes to drop them at your local shelter. You can do this anytime of the year, but at this special time of love and caring and sharing, please, take just those few extra minutes and make this holiday a little more special for a few lonely shelter animals.



A Christmas Shelter Dog’s Poem

’Tis the night before Christmas and all through the town, every shelter is full—we are lost, but not found.

Our numbers are hung on our kennels so bare,

we hope every minute that someone will care.

They’ll come to adopt us and give us the call,

“Come here, Max and Sparkie — come fetch your new ball!”

But now we sit here and think of the days

we were treated so fondly — we had cute, baby ways.

Once we were little, then we grew and we grew.

Now we’re no longer young and we’re no longer new.

So out the back door we were thrown like the trash.

They reacted so quickly — why were they so rash?

We “jump on the children,” “don’t come when they call,”

we “bark when they leave us,” “climb over the wall.”

We should have been neutered, we should have been spayed,

now we suffer the consequence of the errors THEY made.

If only they’d trained us, if only we knew,

we’d have done what they asked us and worshiped them, too.

We were left in the backyard, or worse, let to roam.

Now we’re tired and lonely and out of a home.

They dropped us off here and they kissed us goodbye…

“Maybe someone else will give you a try.”

So now here we are, all confused and alone

in a shelter with others who long for a home.

The kind workers come through with a meal and a pat,

with so many to care for, they can’t stay to chat.
They move to the next kennel, giving each of us cheer…

we know that they wonder how long we’ll be here.

We lay down to sleep and sweet dreams fill our heads

of a home filled with love and our own cozy beds.

Then we wake to see sad eyes, brimming with tears –

our friends filled with emptiness, worry, and fear.

If you can’t adopt us and there’s no room at the inn –

could you help with the bills and fill our food bin?

We count on your kindness each day of the year –

can you give more than hope to everyone here?

Please make a donation to pay for the heat…

and help get us something special to eat.

The shelter that cares for us wants us to live,

and more of us will, if more people will give.



– Author Unknown

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

The Puppy Mill Project Is Doing Fabulous Stuff In Chicago ...




The Puppy Mill Project Rocks....


The Puppy Mill Project

Newsletter 2010
Dear Supporters,
As we get ready to welcome in 2011 I cannot help but reflect upon the accomplishments of the past year. In the short time that we have been in existence our resume is very impressive. From our weekly pet store protests, resulting in store closings, to our support of HB5772 and it's passage, to the forming of a National Puppy Mill Project, this has been quite a year.
As you all know, the more involved we get in the mission to end puppy mills the more we realize the depth and scope of this national disgrace. There is so much more to do but with your continued support and dedication we will get it done. None of this can possibly get done without you. To each one of you that has protested, made phone calls, emailed our legislators, made a donation, or helped rescue our mill dogs, thank you. You are the heart and soul of this organization and your continued commitment to this cause will change the lives of millions of dogs.

Sincerely,
Cari Meyers
First of it's kind in the nation!


Legislation
The Puppy Mill Project supports state and federal legislation that protects dogs from the inhumane treatment they receive in puppy mills.

Illinois's new Pet Store Disclosure law will take effect on Jan 1, 2011. Pet stores will be required to post breeder information on or near the cages of the puppies they are selling. Until now, pet stores were not required to tell the truth about the origin of their puppies. Families have been sold sick puppies and endured high vet bills and heartbreak. Consumers will now be able to do their homework and research the breeder of the puppy they are interested in buying. Once the public learns the truth, we know they will not support this cruel industry.

The Puppy Mill Project supports state and federal legislation that protects dogs from the inhumane treatment they receive in puppy mills.

Illinois's new Pet Store Disclosure law will take effect on Jan 1, 2011. Pet stores will be required to post breeder information on or near the cages of the puppies they are selling. Until now, pet stores were not required to tell the truth about the origin of their puppies. Families have been sold sick puppies and endured high vet bills and heartbreak. Consumers will now be able to do their homework and research the breeder of the puppy they are interested in buying.
Once the public learns the truth, we know they will not support this cruel industry.

Monday, December 20, 2010

This Vet Rocks !!!!

My Puppy Mill Education- by Nancy Kay, DVM ©
After the November election, I learned that Missouri voters passed legislation known as the Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act (Proposition B). As I began surfing the Internet to learn more, I anticipated reading about strict new regulations that would dramatically limit the number of dogs per “breeding factory” along with regulations that would enhance the physical and emotional well being of dogs unfortunate enough to wind up in puppy mills. Here is what I read. Proposition B stipulates that breeders may have up to 50 breeding dogs at any given time (no, the number 50 is not a typo). Additionally, this new legislation requires that dogs be provided with:

-Sufficient food that is provided at least once daily
-Access to water that is not frozen and is free of debris, feces, algae, and other contaminants
-Necessary veterinary care (an examination at least once yearly by a licensed veterinarian)
-Sufficient housing including protection from the elements
-Sufficient space to turn and stretch freely and fully extend limbs
-Adequate rest between breeding cycles (no more than two litters during an 18 month time period)



Fifty dogs at a time? Daily food and clean water required? Enough space to allow dogs to stand up and stretch their legs? Was this really the best that puppy mill reform legislation could provide- nothing more than the bare basics to sustain a modicum of physical comfort for puppy mill “livestock”? How could this be? I addressed my surprise and disappointment by contacting and asking questions of Jennifer Fearing, the California senior state director for the Humane Society of the United States who was in Missouri prior to the election canvassing for votes for Proposition B. Her responses were informative and heartfelt, and she was so genuinely patient in responding to my lack of awareness. Jennifer has graciously allowed me to share her comments with you:

“Under the old Missouri law, dogs can be kept in wire-floored cages just six inches longer than their bodies. The cages can be stacked on top of each other. A veterinarian must make an annual walk-through of a facility but there is no requirement that the dogs get actual exams or even treatment for any existing conditions or injuries. Dogs are bred on every single heat cycle, leading to dogs so bred-out that we routinely see young dogs (three to four years old) whose teeth have all fallen out because their systems are so overtaxed and malnourished, and whose teats are dragging on the ground. The old law does have a provision regarding extreme temperatures, but it says that dogs couldn’t face extreme temperatures for more than three consecutive hours, making enforcement impossible because no inspector is going to stand around with his thermometer in the air for three hours. There is a vague requirement for an exercise plan, but that too is unenforceable and as a result we see dogs who have clearly lived their entire lives on wire floors and never set foot on solid ground.

The new law, which goes into effect one year from passage: Every dog must have a solid-floored enclosure that allows constant, unfettered access to a larger outdoor area. Larger enclosure sizes are required with specific sizing requirements based on the size of the dog. Each dog must receive an annual exam and any dog who is sick or suffering must receive veterinary treatment. No dog may have more than 2 litters in any 18 month period, which essentially means every 3rd cycle is rested, giving them a chance to recuperate from the exhausting cycle of carrying and nursing pups. The time limit mentioned above is removed so that dogs cannot be kept in temperatures below 45 degrees or above 85 degrees, period.

Just as importantly, these new requirements are simple and easy to enforce. Currently in Missouri, if law enforcement gets a complaint call they must call in the experts from the Department of Agriculture to help interpret 30+ pages of vague, confusing and outdated regulations. Because of backlogs and understaffing, it can take six months or longer for an Ag inspector to even show up. But any Sheriff’s deputy can interpret these new requirements – anyone can see if a floor is solid or wire; if cages are stacked; if the dogs have access to an outdoor area; if there are more than 50 dogs; etc. So instead of leaving the dogs to suffer for another six months, law enforcement can file criminal charges on the spot.

And the penalties may seem modest but any violation of the new Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act is a criminal offense, which leads to license forfeiture. And if conditions rise to the level of animal cruelty, the offender can be charged instead under the existing state animal cruelty law.

Missouri is only the fifth state to cap the number of dogs a commercial breeder can keep. Since 2008, Oregon, Washington and Virginia have set the number at 50, and Virginia includes a provision allowing the state to allow more than 50 if certain conditions are met. Louisiana has a cap of 75. It’s important to remember that these bills are not intended to ban commercial breeding, they are simply designed to eliminate the worst abuses at puppy mills and create more humane living conditions for the dogs who live there. And the data (from state and federal inspection reports) are clear that the largest facilities accumulate the most frequent and most severe violations.

I should mention too that the new law is in addition to, and not in lieu of, the existing regulations. Those regulations still exist, this law is simply an overlay to correct the weak and vague areas of the regulations that allowed dogs to suffer.

Finally, the significance of this law passing in the epicenter of the puppy mill industry cannot be overemphasized. It will lead to similar restrictions in other states and to vast improvement in the living conditions of dogs kept for the commercial pet trade.”

Jennifer’s explanations certainly changed my perspective about the benefits provided by Proposition B. While this legislation will not create an existence for a puppy mill victim that in any way resembles my notion of what every dog deserves, no doubt its enforcement will make a positive difference in the current dismal quality of many lives. I must admit that after reading Jennifer’s response my overriding feeling was, “Shame on me!” As a veterinarian I’m embarrassed by my naïveté about puppy mills. To some degree, I think I’ve been floating along that river in Egypt (De Nial)- far more pleasant to be “out of touch” rather than “in touch” with the true horrors of what goes on in puppy mills. Sure, via my blog and in Speaking for Spot I’ve advocated against supporting puppy mills by avoiding purchasing puppies from pet stores or on line (sight and site unseen). I simply don’t think my efforts have been adequate. While I’m certain that I need to do more to create puppy mill reform, I’m not yet sure what that “more” looks like yet. Stay tuned- I will keep you posted as I figure it out. Have you taken a stance against puppy mills? If so what has been your strategy?

By the way, I debated whether or not to release a blog on such a serious topic while my readers are in the midst of the holiday hustle. My hope is that the thoughts expressed will provide some inspiration- always a good thing during the holiday season.

If you would like to respond publicly, please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com/blog/?p=1924.

Best wishes for a lovely holiday season,

Dr. Nancy Kay
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Gateway Pet Guardians.
Over 150 homeless animals rescued!


Gateway Pet Guardians is different from most rescue organizations. We rescue homeless, feral and abandoned animals from the streets of East St. Louis, IL and place them in foster homes. Daily, PJ Hightower feeds these animals and gets to know them as her own. We do not have a shelter and rely solely on our wonderful foster parents to bring these animals in and show them what a human touch feels like.

In 2010, Gateway Pet Guardians has made amazing progress in the East St. Louis Community. We have rescued over 150 animals from an area that is only about two square miles. The city of East St. Louis has no animal control or veterinary clinic. The homeless population is created from a lack of resources and education in the community. Residents of the city own animals that are not spayed or neutered and are not contained.

Also this year, we met with the East St. Louis City Council and discussed a shelter/spay and neuter clinic/education facility for the area. Our goal is to change the community's perception of animals and give them the resources to properly care for their pets. With your help in 2010, we have raised over $45,000 for this facility!

This facility will all not only serve as a temporary shelter for the animals until we can place them in a foster home, but will also allow us to offer FREE spay and neuter services to the community members. In addition to a shelter and surgical center, we will also conduct seminars and after-school programs for children.

In 2011, we will break ground on this state-of-the-art facility! This facility will take more than $45,000 to construct. Our goal is $100,000 before construction begins. With your donation, our facility will not only save the lives of hundreds more homeless animals, but will give the East St. Louis Community the resources needed to curb and eliminate the problem.

Thank you, again for an AMAZING 2010 and we are eagerly looking forward to what 2011 will bring us!


-Jamie Case, Executive Director

Faking It Isn't Always Bad......Is It !!!??!!!


Sunday, December 19, 2010

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/It-s-Not-Too-Late---.html?soid=1102662751827&aid=3GbBB3MJmVM

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/It-s-Not-Too-Late---.html?soid=1102662751827&aid=3GbBB3MJmVM

For All The Wonderful Animal Rescuer.......

I am an animal rescuer. I will never bring about world peace. I will not save the rain forest.
I'm not a brain surgeon and I'll never transplant an organ to save a life. I don't have the ear of a powerful politician or world power. I can't end world hunger.

I'm not a celebrity, and God knows I'm not glamorous!
I'm not looked up to by millions around the world. Very few people even recognize my name.
I'll never win the Nobel Prize.
I'll never save the rain forest or end global warming.
There are a lot of things that I'll never do or become.

But today I placed a dog!

It was a small, scared, bundle of flesh and bones that was dropped off in a shelter by unfeeling people that didn't care what happened to it, but yet who were responsible for it even having existence in the first place.

I found it a home.

It now has contentment and an abundance of love. A warm place to sleep and plenty to eat. A child has a warm fuzzy new friend who will give them unquestioning devotion and teach them about responsibility and love.

A wife and mother has a new spirit to nurture and care for. A husband and a father has a companion to sit at his feet at the end of a hard day of work and help him relax and enjoy life. And a sense of security, that when he is gone all day at work, that there is a protector and a guardian in his home to keep watch over his family.

No, I'm not a rocket scientist but today I saved one of God's precious creatures. Today, I made a difference!

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

I Think Santa Must Of Smelled My Dogs Spots In The Yard....

Santa must have some canine in him but I figured every other furry creature takes a leak in my yard why not Santa.
It's all good !!!

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Monday, December 13, 2010


Season's Greeetings From SPringfield, Missouri Animal Advocacy Foundation

Dear Animal Advocate,

Today was a big day at SAAFhouse, when our 1,000th client came through the door! The lucky dog was Scooby (pictured at right). When Scooby's owner came to pick him up, she received a basket full of dog and people goodies. One thousand surgeries is quite a milestone and yet our work is just beginning...
Things are going well at the clinic, but we need your help during this holiday season. When we opened in August, we immediately started a Spay it Forward fund. Though we have set our spay/neuter rates as low as possible, there are still some clients who are unable to pay even these modest fees.

We hope you'll consider sending a donation to the Spay it Forward fund to help people and pets like Melissa and her cat, Princey. Melissa called recently to cancel Princey's appointment because she was undergoing chemotherapy and had only $25 in her bank account. With the Spay it Forward fund, we were able to help. It was a wonderful feeling to help these two, and it kept Princey's surgery from being delayed and prevented the possibility of him fathering a litter of kittens.

Please consider donating $45 to sponsor a cat surgery or $60 to sponsor a dog surgery. Of course, any amount is welcome. You can donate via PayPal using this link or send donations to SAAF at 1600 North Washington, Springfield, 65803.

Thanks for your continuing support and have a wonderful holiday season.

Janet & the SAAFhouse staff

Sunday, December 12, 2010

Revenge of the dog movie...A MUST SEE !!!

Wouldn't you love to see this but have a puppy mill breeder in that chair ???? It could get ugly folks !!! Put the children to bed and make grandpa a drink.....let the movie begin and I want front row seats !!! Now that would be justice at it's finest !!!

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Wayne Pacelle's Blog ...you gotta love it !!!

Talk Back: Keep Your Paws Off Missouri's Prop B
Several weeks ago I announced the good news that Missouri voters approved Proposition B, requiring that large-scale commercial dog breeders provide in a year’s time sufficient space for dogs, an annual veterinary examination, humane methods of euthanasia, and a limit on the number of reproductively intact animals used for breeding, among a limited number of other humane care standards for dogs. In the few weeks since Prop B was passed by voters, a handful of Missouri lawmakers have stated they will file legislation to gut the language of the measure. One of those legislators, Sen. Bill Stouffer, R-21, actually introduced a bill to completely repeal Prop B and leave Missouri’s dogs in the same horrendous conditions they’ve suffered for years now.


The HSUS
The HSUS and our coalition partners are busy reminding lawmakers that they should respect the will of the one million Missouri voters who favored Prop B. Newspapers across Missouri are already speaking out and telling lawmakers that it is not right for them to subvert the will of the voters, and it is anti-democratic. Our system is built on majority rule, and a majority of Missouri citizens—including majorities in most House and Senate legislative districts—favored Prop B. The voters acted precisely because the legislature has failed to stop puppy mill abuses. Dane Waters had an op-ed about this issue in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Right after the election I noted that, in campaigning against the measure, the Missouri Farm Bureau leveled an array of false charges against Prop B and also against The HSUS. I wrote an open letter to address these charges and to set the record straight. We received a number of powerful comments in response, and I want to share them with you.

An Open Letter To The Missouri Farm Bureau from Wayne Pacelle

An Open Letter to the Missouri Farm Bureau
Missouri voters approved Proposition B, requiring that large-scale commercial breeders provide in a year’s time sufficient space for dogs, an annual veterinary examination, humane methods of euthanasia, and a limit on the number of reproductively intact animals used for breeding, among a limited number of other humane care standards for dogs. In campaigning against the measure, the Missouri Farm Bureau leveled an array of false charges against Prop B and also against The Humane Society of the United States, which worked to pass Prop B. I write to address these charges and to set the record straight.


The HSUS

False Claim: The Missouri Farm Bureau argued that Prop B was not just about dogs, but about ending animal agriculture.
Fact: The Missouri Secretary of State concluded, in fact, that the measure deals only with one species: canis lupus familiaris, or the domesticated dog. There is no reasonable interpretation that it would apply to cattle, pigs, chickens, or any other domesticated or wild species. If there were an attempt by some organization to promote humane treatment of other species, that type of reform would have to go to the Legislature or to the people in the form of a separate ballot measure. Missouri voters would probably reject any measure that went too far. We are not aware of any such effort, and Prop B has no bearing on any future reform efforts.

False claim: The Missouri Farm Bureau argued that existing regulations governing dog breeding are sufficient and that they simply need to be enforced.
Fact: Under Prop B, Missouri’s enormous puppy mill problem will be scaled down to a level that is easier for the state to oversee, manage and enforce. It is the backers of Prop B, not the Farm Bureau or the commercial dog breeding industry, that have advocated for robust enforcement through the years; this is the first we’ve heard of the Farm Bureau calling for more rigorous enforcement, but we welcome the encouragement. The puppy mill problem has gotten worse year by year, and the Farm Bureau has stood by as more reckless breeders have flocked to Missouri and humane organizations have had to deal with thousands of dogs relinquished by mills or seized after terrible problems came to light. It costs humane groups millions of dollars to clean up the mess made by these large-scale puppy mills.

Under current rules, it is legal to keep a breeding dog in a wire cage six inches longer than her body, to keep her confined in that cage for her entire life, to allow her to be outside during the extremes of winter, to allow animals in cages stacked above to defecate on the animals below, to never call on a veterinarian to examine an animal, and to abandon or kill dogs once they are no longer wanted. I am amazed that the Farm Bureau somehow thinks such standards for dogs are adequate.

False claim: The HSUS wants to eliminate pet ownership.
Fact: The HSUS celebrates pet ownership, and has done so for all 56 years of its existence. While we certainly urge would-be dog owners to look to the pool of homeless dogs kept by shelters and rescue groups, we have instructions on our website and in our publications that encourage would-be dog owners to follow simple guidelines when they shop for a dog from a breeder. Your invoking of fabricated quotes or quotes taken out of context to misrepresent our positions is dishonest and defamatory. Every day at The HSUS, our staff bring their dogs to work—the action of committed and caring pet owners who celebrate their relationship with their animals. Indeed, The HSUS published the 2008 book, “Dogs at Work,” to guide companies in instituting this valuable opportunity to more employees. Our daily work is to celebrate the bond we have with pets, to help people find pets appropriate for their household, to help people keep their pets, or to find ways to reunite people with their pets.

False claim: The HSUS isn’t interested in improving farm animal welfare, but only in ending animal agriculture.
Fact: We work with animal producers throughout the country, and included among our members are ranchers and others involved in the business of agriculture. We have been a financial supporter of Humane Farm Animal Care, which certifies high welfare production, and The HSUS also provides major support to the Global Animal Partnership, which also promotes high welfare standards in agriculture. In developing countries, our work has ensured that farm animals are stunned before being slaughtered, and we have a raft of other programs working with farmers. We have long supported more humane treatment of animals in agriculture, and in terms of political activity, we have promoted improvements to slaughter and transport systems, and, on the farm, giving the animals enough room to “stand up, lie down, turn around, and freely extend their limbs.” If the Missouri Farm Bureau believes that allowing farm animals to turn around equates to an end to all animal use, then that is an unfortunate statement about its own lack of ethical standards in the conduct of its business.

False claim: The HSUS has destroyed the egg industry in California.
Fact: The HSUS did work to pass Proposition 2 in 2008, but that measure simply stipulates that egg production be cage-free—a modest animal welfare and food safety policy that enjoys the support of numerous retailers and two-thirds of Calilfornia voters. Already companies like Burger King, Hellmann’s, and scores of others are using cage-free eggs. It does not prevent the raising of chickens for egg production. What’s more, it does not go into effect until 2015, so it’s hard to imagine that a measure that has not gone into effect has resulted in the destruction of the industry. One study even found that the Prop 2 campaign in California increased demand for cage-free eggs while reducing demand for eggs from caged hens, sending a strong signal to the industry about what consumers expect of it.

False claim: The HSUS “spends less than one percent of its funds on the actual care of pets.”
Fact: The HSUS spends millions of dollars on companion animal care, and spends more than $20 million a year on our programs that support local animal shelters and provide direct care for domestic animals and wildlife. The HSUS actually provides direct care to more animals than any other group in the nation, and maintains five animal care centers, a national veterinary services program, and a national emergency response unit that rescues animals from all over the nation. We also spend millions preventing cruelty, and it’s that work that the Missouri Farm Bureau and other animal-use groups apparently do not like.

It was 12 years ago that The HSUS helped to qualify and pass an anti-cockfighting ballot initiative in Missouri—the only other initiative petition on animal welfare in Missouri history. The Missouri Farm Bureau opposed that ballot measure, too, arguing that a ban on that barbaric practice would lead to an end to all hunting, fishing, rodeo and animal agriculture. As with Prop B, voters approved that measure, and there’s been no attempt to outlaw hunting or animal agriculture in any way in the 12 years since. The Farm Bureau deceived some voters then with that argument, just as it did this year with Prop B, but it was the right decision for Missouri. Staged fights between animals are morally wrong, just as lifelong confinement of dogs in small cages at puppy mills is wrong, too.

The Missouri Constitution allows for citizen lawmaking, and the principle underlying it is majority rule. The will of the people should be respected—even if the Farm Bureau and some lawmakers disagree with the decision. Both the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Kansas City Star have within the last few days urged elected officials to honor the vote of the people. The fact is, a majority of the people of Missouri voted in favor of Prop B. The measure was approved by a majority of voters in a majority of state House and Senate districts. That counts in a democracy.

If you care about animal welfare, leave the dogs alone. If you care about democracy, let the law take effect and do not work to subvert it.

Animals of YouTube sing "Deck the Halls"

Thursday, December 9, 2010

*Christmas Dogs*

The 12 Dogs of Christmas - Singing Live from the North Pole

David's Dogs and Kelly's Cats....

David's Dogs


Join Blues player David Backes and the St. Charles Humane Society to help neglected animals through David's Dogs. David and and his wife, Kelly, also work to help the shelter by promoting and participating in various fundraisers. They also are members of the Board of Directors.

In addition, Kelly launched her own program, Kelly's Kat's in December 2010.

The St. Charles Humane Society provides a home for nearly 1,000 cats and dogs each year. The majority of the animals at the shelter come from private citizens who are unable to keep their pets for one reason or another. Staff and volunteers care for these animals and help to find them a new home, and a second chance.

FOX 2 Video: Blues Star Gives Assist in Animal Rescue

David's Dogs of the Month

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Every month, David and the St. Charles Humane Society select three dogs as David's Dogs of the Month. They would love nothing more than to meet you! If you are interested in adopting one of our furry friends, please visit www.stcharleshumanesociety.org or call 636-949-9918.


YADIER
Yadi loves to play ball or frisbee and has tons of energy. Yadi is also a big baby that loves to sit in your lap and be loved. He gets along with other dogs, and prefers to be with you at all times. He can climb fences. Yadi would do best in a home that has the energy and time to match his!
RAJA
Raja is a very quiet girl inside. She needs an experienced mastiff owner and a home with a privacy fence. Once Raja is comfortable with you she will follow you everywhere and will greet you with a beautiful smile. Raja is leery of young men, but can live with them if everyone is willing to take the time with her. She is still young and loves to play. Raja is a wonderful dog and would make a great addition to your home.
MIGHTY
Mighty lives up to his name. He weighs 92.8lbs! He loves people and also gets along with other dogs. He likes to go for walks, play ball and
sit in your lap. Mighty was rescued from another shelter where he was being overlooked by other potential adopters because of his size. He is a gentle giant, and a good dog out in the community. If you are looking for a big dog, Mighty is your guy!


Kelly's Kats of the Month
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David's wife, Kelly, is supporting the St. Charles Humane Society with her very own program, Kelly's Kats. Three new adoptable cats will be up for adoption each month. If you are interested in adopting, please visit www.stcharleshumanesociety.org or call 636-949-9918.


DUSTY
Dusty will be one in February and is "the caregiver." He is very welcoming to new kittens, and loves to sit on your lap or hop on your back when you are bending over. He enjoys playing and exploring, and would make a great friend for another feline. Dusty needs a kind, loving home to show him what true love is all about.
SWEET POTATO
Sweet Potato is 6 months old. Sweet Potato and her siblings Oatmeal and Ginger were all found abandoned on our doorstep during the heat of the summer in a cat carrier. Sweet Potato enjoys the usual playing, exploring, and cuddling in her warm cozy bed. If you can find a place in your heart for this beautiful classic orange tabby come by our shelter. Who knows you may just find a new friend to love!
OATMEAL
Oatmeal is also 6 months old. and was found abandoned with his sisters. He is a handsome pale beige tabby that loves to explore and adores toys that dangle from strings. He will make a great companion. Oatmeal needs a kind owner willing to give him a good life, love and affection!



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About the St. Charles Humane Society
Located off Highway 94 South near TGI Fridays
1099 Pralle Lane, St. Charles, MO 63303
636-949-9918

The St. Charles Humane Society is a no-kill animal shelter located in St. Charles County. While the majority of the animals come from owner surrenders, the shelter does take animals from other rescue groups when there is room and also works with the Missouri Department of Agriculture to help find a home for animals rescued from hoarders or unlicensed breeding facilities. Most of the animals at the shelter are healthy, but they do rescue animals in need of extensive medical treatment or that need a foster home for a long recovery.

All of the funding for the St. Charles Humane Society comes from concerned citizens willing to donate to the cause.

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

St. Charles NO KILL HUmane Society....

David's Dogs
Join Blues player David Backes and the St. Charles Humane Society to help neglected animals through David's Dogs. David and and his wife, Kelly, also work to help the shelter by promoting and participating in various fundraisers. They also are members of the Board of Directors.

In addition, Kelly launched her own program, Kelly's Kat's in December 2010.

The St. Charles Humane Society provides a home for nearly 1,000 cats and dogs each year. The majority of the animals at the shelter come from private citizens who are unable to keep their pets for one reason or another. Staff and volunteers care for these animals and help to find them a new home, and a second chance.

FOX 2 Video: Blues Star Gives Assist in Animal Rescue

David's Dogs of the Month

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Every month, David and the St. Charles Humane Society select three dogs as David's Dogs of the Month. They would love nothing more than to meet you! If you are interested in adopting one of our furry friends, please visit www.stcharleshumanesociety.org or call 636-949-9918.


YADIER
Yadi loves to play ball or frisbee and has tons of energy. Yadi is also a big baby that loves to sit in your lap and be loved. He gets along with other dogs, and prefers to be with you at all times. He can climb fences. Yadi would do best in a home that has the energy and time to match his!
RAJA
Raja is a very quiet girl inside. She needs an experienced mastiff owner and a home with a privacy fence. Once Raja is comfortable with you she will follow you everywhere and will greet you with a beautiful smile. Raja is leery of young men, but can live with them if everyone is willing to take the time with her. She is still young and loves to play. Raja is a wonderful dog and would make a great addition to your home.
MIGHTY
Mighty lives up to his name. He weighs 92.8lbs! He loves people and also gets along with other dogs. He likes to go for walks, play ball and
sit in your lap. Mighty was rescued from another shelter where he was being overlooked by other potential adopters because of his size. He is a gentle giant, and a good dog out in the community. If you are looking for a big dog, Mighty is your guy!


Kelly's Kats of the Month
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David's wife, Kelly, is supporting the St. Charles Humane Society with her very own program, Kelly's Kats. Three new adoptable cats will be up for adoption each month. If you are interested in adopting, please visit www.stcharleshumanesociety.org or call 636-949-9918.


DUSTY
Dusty will be one in February and is "the caregiver." He is very welcoming to new kittens, and loves to sit on your lap or hop on your back when you are bending over. He enjoys playing and exploring, and would make a great friend for another feline. Dusty needs a kind, loving home to show him what true love is all about.
SWEET POTATO
Sweet Potato is 6 months old. Sweet Potato and her siblings Oatmeal and Ginger were all found abandoned on our doorstep during the heat of the summer in a cat carrier. Sweet Potato enjoys the usual playing, exploring, and cuddling in her warm cozy bed. If you can find a place in your heart for this beautiful classic orange tabby come by our shelter. Who knows you may just find a new friend to love!
OATMEAL
Oatmeal is also 6 months old. and was found abandoned with his sisters. He is a handsome pale beige tabby that loves to explore and adores toys that dangle from strings. He will make a great companion. Oatmeal needs a kind owner willing to give him a good life, love and affection!



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About the St. Charles Humane Society
Located off Highway 94 South near TGI Fridays
1099 Pralle Lane, St. Charles, MO 63303
636-949-9918

The St. Charles Humane Society is a no-kill animal shelter located in St. Charles County. While the majority of the animals come from owner surrenders, the shelter does take animals from other rescue groups when there is room and also works with the Missouri Department of Agriculture to help find a home for animals rescued from hoarders or unlicensed breeding facilities. Most of the animals at the shelter are healthy, but they do rescue animals in need of extensive medical treatment or that need a foster home for a long recovery.

All of the funding for the St. Charles Humane Society comes from concerned citizens willing to donate to the cause.

St. Charles Humane Society Rescues 17 Dogs From Puppy Mill

St. Charles Humane Society rescues 17 dogs from puppy mill

ROY SYKES / JOURNAL St. Charles Humane Society staffer Ashley Minton grooms Leo, a 4-year-old Pomeranian rescued from a Mexico, Mo., puppy mill. Leo had little or no human contact while at the puppy mill, so staff members work to give him the socialization he needs to fit in with an adoptive family. .
..Related Links
Related: St. Charles Humane Society
When Kelly Backes and other St. Charles Humane Society volunteers walked into a puppy mill in Mexico, Mo., they saw dogs that could barely walk, having been caged up for most of their lives. They saw malnourished dogs covered in feces.

"You don't have to be a dog lover. Anyone who walked onto those premises would know it's wrong to keep dogs in those conditions," Backes said.

The puppy mill owners decided to auction off its collection of adult dogs and puppies just before the Nov. 3 vote on Proposition B, known as the "Puppy Mill Initiative." St. Charles Humane Society staff and volunteers saw an opportunity to help some distressed animals.

Proposition B, passed by Missouri voters, limits breeders to 50 breeding dogs and requires regular feeding and veterinary care.

"Missouri is known as the No. 1 puppy mill state in the country," said Backes, a board member for the St. Charles Humane Society. "When I received the auction list it intrigued me. We decided that if there's an auction, it's a chance to help these dogs."

Backes and her husband, St. Louis Blues forward David Backes, and Jamie and Mark Buehrle contributed a total of $3,000 for the effort. Mark Buehrle, a graduate of Francis Howell North High School, is a Chicago White Sox pitcher.

The money was used to buy 17 dogs from the puppy mill during the auction Oct. 29 and 30.

"They had matted hair, they were covered in feces, confined in wire cages, their teeth are rotting, they're out in the cold and heat with no shelter," Kelly Backes said.

Several dogs had to have rotten teeth pulled because they had no veterinary care, she said.

Several of the dogs have since been adopted. Two others, a Pomeranian and a Pekinese, still are available for adoption.

"We're very fortunate here," Backes said. "We get a lot of foot traffic, and a lot of the animals we get in are adopted out quickly."

Kim Brown, executive director of the St. Charles Humane Society on Pralle Lane, said it's extremely rewarding to find homes for the puppy mill survivors.

"These dogs deserve so much better," Brown said. "For the adult dogs, at least half their lives have been spent in that kind of environment. We'll be able to make their last years much better."

Another dog, a beagle they dubbed Big Bertha, was pregnant when they bought her. She had a litter of six puppies, but two died within 36 hours. Another had a severe cleft palate that a vet determined was inoperable. The puppy was euthanized, Backes said.

The cleft palate is genetic, and usually once a dog gives birth to a cleft palate puppy, they are spayed so they don't continue passing on the gene, she said. But it's likely this isn't Big Bertha's first litter.

The Backeses are fostering Big Bertha and the puppies until they are healthy, weaned, spayed and neutered so they can be adopted.

The shelter also has a 9-year-old Chihuahua. Staff and volunteers are working to help socialize the dog.

"That's the amazing thing about animals," Backes said. "They can be mistreated like that, but still end up making amazing pets after they're shown that people can be kind, too."

Friday, December 3, 2010

A Big Shout Out To OPTspot for all they do......

Liz Rudder and her wonderful organization Optspot in St. Louis does so much for educating and assisting on getting cats and dogs spay and neutered. Thanks for all you do !!!!!!

Thursday, December 2, 2010

This could make a huge difference for all the chained dogs in St. Louis County

If you are a STL County resident, please, please take a minute to call your STL County rep

Calling all county residents and animal lovers! The current St. Louis County Anti-Tethering Law was passed in 2006. It has been our experience that this law is not being enforced. We have been working with officials for several months trying to resolve this and strengthen the law. Barbara Fraser, the president of the St. Louis Co. County Council, has accepted the responsibility of helping us do just that, but we need your help. Changes and additions will be presented to the Council this coming Tues, Dec. 7th, 6:00 p.m. Those changes are three fold and include the following:
1. An overnight ban between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and
6:00 a.m. The current law prohibits banning for no more
than 10 continuous hours and no more than 12 hrs. in a
24 hr. period. This has been difficult to enforce as the
dog must essentially be watched for 10 hrs. By adding
the overnight ban, this law will become much more
enforceable.
2. A dog may not be chained/tethered outside unattended
during extreme weather conditions including
a. when actual or effective temperatures drop to 32
degrees or lower
b. when actual or effective temperatures rise to 90
degrees or higher, or when a heat advisory has been
issued by a local or state agency
c. when tornado, severe thunderstorm, or blizzard/ice
warnings have been issued by the National Weather
Service
3. Because an ordinance will have limited success if it does
not include penalties, fines and/or penalties will be
added. For example, a warning may be issued with
time frame for compliance. A second violation would be
a monetary amount. Third and subsequent violations
would have higher monetary fines. At some point if
violations continue, the dog could be confiscated.
We need your help in convincing the Council members that this is what their constituents want for man's best friend. You can help by
1. attending the meeting on Dec. 7th as a show of support
2. MOST IMPORTANTLY, contact your council representative
either by phone, mail, or e-mail to encourage them vote
yes on the proposed changes.

You can find a map of Districts at
http://www.stlouisco.com/elections/DISTMAPS.html

1st. District Hazel Erby (314)615-5436
2nd District Kathleen Kelly Burkett (314)615-5437
3rd District Colleen Wasinger (314)615-5438
4th District Mike O'Mara (314)615-5439
5th District Barbara Fraser (314) 615-5441
6th District Steve Stenger (314)615-5442
7th District Greg Quinn (314)615-5443

I realize this is short notice for attending the meeting, but it will only take a few minutes to contact your representative.
The chained dogs of St. Louis Co. are hoping that you will help them. and I thank you, Connie

Dear God.....

Dear God: Let me give you a list of just some of the things I must remember to be a good Dog.

1. I will not eat the cats' food before they eat it or after they throw it up.

2. I will not roll on dead seagulls, fish, crabs, etc., just because I like the way they smell.

3. The Litter Box is not a cookie jar.

4. The sofa is not a 'face towel'.

5. The garbage collector is not stealing our stuff.

6. I will not play tug-of-war with Dad's underwear when he's on the toilet.

7. Sticking my nose into someone's crotch is an unacceptable way of saying 'hello'.

8. I don't need to suddenly stand straight up when I'm under the coffee table

9. I must shake the rainwater out of my fur before entering the house - not after.

10. I will not come in from outside and immediately drag my butt across the capet.

11. I will not sit in the middle of the living room and lick my crotch.

12. The cat is not a 'squeaky toy' so when I play with him and he makes that noise, it's usually not a good thing.

P.S. Dear God: When I get to Heaven may I have my testicles back?

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Christian the Lion

How To Teach A Dog A New Trick....

Haunted By Sad Eyes In Puppy Mills

November 30, 2010

Haunted by Sad Eyes in Puppy Mills
Puppy Mill Action Week, Nov. 29 through Dec. 3, celebrates people like Mary who go the extra mile to help dogs from puppy mills .Mary and her Boston Terrier, Hudson, helped puppy mill survivor Nikki recover.
As the top signature gatherer for Missouri's Proposition B, Mary was influential in the campaign against cruel puppy mills in that state. For this year's Puppy Mill Action Week, Mary remembers how—and why—she got involved with this issue.

How did you first learn about puppy mills?
About five years ago, my family was looking for a dog. I have so many terrible images from that time that I can never erase—so many sad eyes staring at me from cages. There isn't a cold winter or hot summer day when I don't think about those dogs suffering in puppy mills, stuck for their entire lives inside wire cages barely large enough for them to stretch or turn around.

At one breeder's facility, we saw dogs so filthy you couldn't tell what breed they were. When a pair of dogs started fighting, the breeder simply explained, "Oh, my Boston Terriers fight the most," and she crammed the two fighting dogs back into an incredibly small cage.

I knew then that God exposed me to this so I would be a voice for these defenseless creatures. I never visited another breeder.

How did you get involved in the Missourians for the Protection of Dogs/Yes on Prop B campaign?
A friend asked me if I would help, and I readily agreed. I met so many amazing people throughout Missouri. Countless thousands of everyday citizens in Missouri, from lawyers and doctors to teachers and politicians, are passionate about this issue. They want to end the injustice that has gone on far too long in Missouri.

We have been tricked by pet stores into believing their puppies are raised by loving people. I'm thrilled that this industry has been exposed for what it is. No one should ever buy a dog without seeing how the parent dogs are living.

When you consider that 90 percent of all pet store dogs come from puppy mills, and 30 to 40 percent of those dogs come from Missouri, it's clear why we needed to pass Prop B.

What was your secret for gathering so many signatures?
After I had gathered 2,000 signatures, I lost track. I was involved in so many other organizations that my husband and I went to at least one or two charitable events a week. I asked everyone at these events for their signature.

People were so eager to sign the petition that many even called me later to ask if their friends could stop at my home to sign the petition. I can't begin to tell you how many people expressed their opinion on how overdue Prop B was, and how they would do anything to help the suffering dogs.

How else did you help with Proposition B after it was certified for the ballot?
I wrote to my legislators about how important Prop B was and I kept my friends informed about the campaign.

I understand you are fostering a puppy mill survivor now. Can you tell me a little about that?
My family just fostered and adopted out an absolute doll of dog, Nikki, who came to us one day after the St. Charles Humane Society rescued her from a puppy mill with over a thousand dogs. I've never felt so moved by a dog before.

When Nikki first came to us, she was completely broken and had a deeply sad look of rejection in her eyes. Having never walked on any surface other than a wire-bottomed cage, she couldn't walk on my tile or marble floors. If you tried gently to pet her, she would drop to the floor in fear.

Because of the wire cage, Nikki's paws are much wider than those of a normal dog. Her otherwise white paws are permanently stained from standing in her own waste and blood.

Thanks to love and patience—including canine encouragement from her dogs—Nikki is beginning to trust people again. She learned to walk cautiously on all my floors and loves going on walks.

A wonderful couple with another schnauzer adopted Nikki, so she can be loved the rest of her life. I feel it's the very least we, as a society, owe her for the living hell she endured for her first eight years.

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

USDA Fails To Crack Down On Puppy Mills....

USDA fails to crack down on puppy mills
The Associated Press
... government report says dogs are dying and living in horrific conditions due to lax government enforcement of large kennels known as puppy mills. ...


USDA fails to crack down on puppy mills

By MARY CLARE JALONICK (AP) – May 25, 2010

WASHINGTON — An internal government report says dogs are dying and living in horrific conditions due to lax government enforcement of large kennels known as puppy mills.

Investigators say the Department of Agriculture agency in charge of enforcing the Animal Welfare Act often ignores repeat violations, waives penalties and doesn't adequately document inhumane treatment of dogs. In one case cited by the department's inspector general, 27 dogs died at an Oklahoma breeding facility after inspectors had visited the facility several times and cited it for violations.

The review, conducted between 2006 and 2008, found that more than half of those who had already been cited for violations flouted the law again. It details grisly conditions at several facilities and includes photos of dogs with gaping wounds, covered in ticks and living among pools of feces.

The report recommends that the animal care unit at the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service immediately confiscate animals that are dying or seriously suffering, and better train its inspectors to document, report and penalize wrongdoing.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Tuesday that the department takes the report seriously and will force immediate action to improve enforcement, penalties and inspector training. He noted the investigation was conducted before his time in office and called it troubling.

"USDA will reinforce its efforts under its animal welfare responsibilities, including tougher penalties for repeat offenders and greater consistent action to strongly enforce the law," he said.

The investigators visited 68 dog breeders and dog brokers in eight states that had been cited for at least one violation in the previous three years. On those visits, they found that first-time violators were rarely penalized, even for more serious violations, and repeat offenders were often let off the hook as well. The agency also gave some breeders a second chance to correct their actions even when they found animals dying or suffering, delaying confiscation of the animals.

"(Animal care) generally took little or no enforcement actions against these facilities during the period," the investigators wrote, adding that the agency placed too much emphasis on educating the violators instead of penalizing them.

Online: 69 page report

USDA Inspector General report:
http://www.usda.gov/oig/webdocs/33002-4-SF.pdf

Don't Chain Your Dogs Up...........


Sunday, November 28, 2010

Not Worth The Time Or Money..........

Agricultural groups weigh options for fighting Proposition B
Monday, November 22, 2010
BY Jessica Stephens
COLUMBIA — Groups opposing Proposition B lost their battle in the polls on Election Day. Now they're hoping to counter that loss with a win in the courtroom or the state legislature.
The ballot initiative, adds restrictions to commercial dog breeders. It applies to all facilities that own more than 10 female sexually intact dogs and breed them with the intention of selling their offspring.
Proposition B provides clear guidance to inspectors.Agricultural groups such as the Missouri Federation of Animal Owners, the Missouri Pet Breeders Association and the Missourians for Animal Care Coalition are working to keep Proposition B from taking effect at all. These groups have been working with Rep. Mike Parson and Rep. Tom Loehner, who work on the House Agricultural Policy Committee, to determine which course of action is most likely to weaken or eliminate the law.

Loehner said he is considering filing a bill that would "grandfather in" licensed breeders, or exempt breeders who were licensed before the election, from having to meet the new restrictions.

If the new law's opponents choose to fight Proposition B in the Missouri legislature, they must wait until Dec. 1 to prefile any new bills. These prefiled bills would then be introduced Jan. 5, the first day of the General Assembly session, according to the Missouri House of Representatives website. Any proposed bill would need 82 yes votes before moving to the state Senate.

MU law professor Richard Reuben said any attempt to fight Proposition B through the state legislature or court system would be a long shot — and expensive.

Reuben said trying to repeal or weaken the law would mean opposition groups must pay for attorneys, filing costs and possible appeal costs if they choose to appeal in the courts.

"It's not an inexpensive proposition," he said. "You could be looking at hundreds of thousands of dollars."

If they go the judicial route, Reuben said groups opposed to Proposition B must find something illegal in the way the law was enacted or find a constitutional provision that would trump the new law.

Reuben said fighting the law through the state Legislature might be more effective, but that it's still not likely to be successful. If agricultural groups go this route, they must try to get both the House and Senate to pass an amendment modifying Proposition B or eliminating it altogether. This amendment must then be signed by the governor before becoming a law.

Reuben said getting this kind of legislation passed wouldn't be easy, especially since Proposition B won with a popular vote.

But Loehner said Proposition B certainly has enough opposition to merit a second look. He pointed out that most of the people who voted in favor of the law live in cities and don't understand what it's like raising animals for profit. He added that 103 out of 114 counties rejected Proposition B.

But Reuben pointed out that fighting Proposition B might not be worth the time and money it would require of opposition groups. "There gets to be a real point where they have to ask themselves if the cost to fight the law is more than the cost of complying," he said.

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Real Life Meets Second Life

A WEEKEND FOR LUCAS BENEFIT for THE SMILING DOG FARMS
November 26th, 27th and 29th.

With the innovation of the Internet comes the virtual world, Second Life. Second Life is a 3d virtual world environment that allows people from all over the world to meet and chat and interact. It is becoming very popular and well known throughout the country and the world. Corporations like Intel, Cisco, CNN, IBM, and many others have placed in world locations in the virtual world.

The live music scene in Second Life has become something of it’s own innovation. Music companies are looking and listening. Several musicians have actually signed contracts and the talent is incredible. It is amazing to have musicians from all over the world be heard by others in a unique forum such as Second Life. There are 3d venues and people come as if they were attending a real world concert.

November 26tth, 27th, and 28th is the big event, called “A WEEKEND FOR LUCAS”. Over 25 hours of live music each day with some of Second Life’s best musicians.

Lucas was a dog that was rescued from certain death over a year ago by Robert Cabral from www.boundangels.org. Lucas was abused and neglected most of his life. Finally, Jay Hellerich from The Smiling Dog Farms, was contacted and agreed to take Lucas. Lucas sadly passed away since but we know that his last days were his best ones. In his honor we have created this wonderful event, now on our 4th year. All proceeds going to www.smilingdogfarms.com.

Smiling Dog Farms is a private animal sanctuary that survives solely on donations. Their efforts to save lives is truly rare in this day and age

This is a wonderful newsworthy story that needs to be told. To bring the efforts of a virtual world to the real world in a positive way can make a difference. The true hope is that this event can raise awareness not only at the local levels but the national levels as well. We urge all of those receiving this press release to please respond. Jay Hellerich is available for interviews and any specific information you may need

St. Louis Senior Dog Project....


Farewell to Annie Berg The St. Louis Senior Dog Project is a not-for-profit dog rescue organization specializing in older dogs but taking in and finding homes for dogs of all ages. See our adoptable dogs here. We'll be at the Kirkwood Petco 11 to 3 Saturday, November 20 from 11 to 3. This will be a special Adopt-A-Senior-Dog Day. All senior dogs will have low adoption fees for this day only of $50 to $75. And senior citizens adopting senior dogs will receive free vet care for life through the Stray Rescue clinic. But if you're not interested in a senior dog, we will also have many young dogs there as well.

OUR 2011 Calendar is now available. You can purchase it online at www.yearbox.com/seniordog or at one of our adoption events. Volunteers will also be selling calendars. A great Christmas gift for your dog-loving friends.

I liked her. That's about it. I liked her.


She was a little blond corgi who'd spent her seven years as a breeder, but she came to the front of her cage when I whispered her name. This was at a dog auction three weeks ago where one of the state's largest breeders was shutting down.

She seemed tired, a little worn. But what would you expect from a dog whose had too many puppies? She still had milk from the last litter.

Everyone described her as "sweet, sweet, sweet," but someone did warn me that she was sick. That made me want her all the more. I won the bid, took her home and placed her in a foster home. We took her to the vet. She was thin; she was running a temperature, but we were all optimistic that day. We could nurse her back to health. We were wrong.

She rallied for awhile. It looked like she was on her way-- even though we found out she had mammary tumors. We could fix that,\. Than a few days ago she stopped eating. She became lethargic. We took her back for another vet visit.

This time the news was bad. She was in liver failure and she had some sort of anemia. She wasn't going to get better. So we let her go gently. She'd had three weeks of love in her foster home, but that wasn't at all what I had mind. I thought we could give her half her life in a good home with toys and fancy dog beds. The works.

We have so many good days and so much good news. But nothing makes the losses any easier.

Ellen Ellick
President/Founder
St. Louis Senior Dog Project
EllenE9466@aol.com

A Holiday Adopt Don't Shop Wish by Melissa Karpel

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

You've Got To Admire Bob Barker......

Proposition B was supported by animal welfare groups from all across the state

The assertion by the dog breeders' representative that they were attacked by out-of-state animal rights groups could not be farther from the truth ("Contempt," Nov. 9).

Proposition B was supported by animal welfare groups from across the state, including the Humane Society of Missouri, Wayside Waifs (Kansas City), Central Missouri Humane Society, Humane Society of Southwest Missouri (Springfield), Stray Rescue of St. Louis and the Missouri Alliance for Animal Legislation.

The cruelties associated with puppy mills is an animal welfare issue, not an animal rights issue. Proposition B still will permit kennels to breed dogs. Proposition B will ensure the humane treatment of dogs confined at large breeding operations. It will ensure veterinary care, access to water and nutritious food and adequate living space and exercise. This is about the welfare of dogs and has strong support among all Missouri animal-welfare advocates.

Proposition B was endorsed by former U.S. Sen. Jack Danforth. The wife of U.S. Sen. Christopher "Kit" Bond, Linda, served on the Puppy Mill Reform Committee, which helped advance Proposition B.

Missouri Attorney Gen. Chris Koster said that plans to overturn voter approval of new rules to rein in puppy mills would probably fail because the language is not as overreaching as some opponents have claimed.

All Missourians should be proud that we have reasonable welfare standards in place to protect dogs.

Bob Baker • St. Louis Executive Director, Missouri Alliance for Animal Legislation

PetShopPuppies.org is Fabulous website to check out....


The holidays are fast approaching. The commercial dog breeding industry boasts that 50% of annual sales occur between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. Please help us combat holiday puppy sales by educating the public about the realities of this cruel industry. We are offering our educational brochures, free of charge, to all those willing to get involved. We will even pay for shipping.

Follow this link to preview our brochures. You can also use the following link for creative ways to distribute brochures.

To order 200 of our brochures, go to their site and it will tell you how to with your name and mailing address.


Also, if you, or someone you know has purchased, or are considering purchasing, a pet store puppy, please fill out a request for our free puppy report. It will help you better understand the true origin of your puppy and provides us with very important information which allows us to track the activities of this industry.

We believe education and awareness are the keys to stopping puppy mills. Please continue to help us speak out on behalf of puppy mill dogs.
Thank you,
PetShopPuppies, Inc.

Go to their fabulous website at PetShopPuppies.org
Did you know that 90% or more of the puppies/dogs sold at Pet Stores are from Puppy Mills and 30-40% of puppies/dogs sold anywhere in the nation at pet stores are coming from Missouri.
Please don't ever buy a pet from a PET STORE !!!!

Thursday, November 11, 2010

How To Work WIth A Puppy Mill Dog......


Here are some resources to help with puppymill dogs training

http://www.ehow.com/how_4998641_care-rescued-puppy-mill-dog.html

http://www.ehow.com/how_5766598_house-break-dog-puppy-mill.html

Every mill survivor is different. What works on one or many, will completely fail on others; the only thing that is consistent is that they will need lots of patience, understanding, love, and probably most importantly, unconditional acceptance of what they are and what their limitations may be. At first glance a mill survivor may look like many of your friends' dogs; maybe not a perfect example of the breed, but close. What you won't see is the condition they were in when came into rescue. Many have fur so matted that it all had to be shaved off and even the short haired breeds suffer from thin dull coats. Many times removing the filth and matting have only revealed open sores, usually from flea allergies or sarcoptic mange. Their ears are often full of filth and usually mites and some survivors suffer from permanent hearing loss because of untreated ear infections. Most survivors require the removal of rotten teeth, even young dogs. The gums are usually very infected and the teeth have excessive buildup on them. Many vets who are not familiar with puppy mill rescued dogs will miscalculate the age of the dog if using only the teeth as their guide. Many survivors also suffer from swollen, splayed and sore feet from so much time walking on wire. While finally getting some good nutrition and extensive medical care after arriving in rescue, all too often there remains the psychological damage that can't be fixed with a bath, medicine, or surgery. We would love to say that every puppy mill survivor only needs love to turn it into a wonderful family pet, but that would be a lie. Love is definitely needed in large amounts, but so is patience. The damage done during the years in the mill usually can be overcome, but it takes time and dedication. It takes a very special adopter for one of these dogs. Not being "up to it" is no crime, but you need to be honest with yourself, and us, about your expectations. These dogs have already been through more than their share of heartache and if your entire family is not willing to make the commitment, the dog is better off staying in our care until the perfect home for them is found. Handling:
Many mill survivors have spent their entire life in the mill with only a elevated wire cage to call home. Puppies who grow up in a mill miss out on many crucial socialization periods with humans and they never learn to trust, to love, or to play. They have had very minimum physical contact with people and have virtually no concept of what to expect (or what is expected of them) when they are placed in a family situation. Their life in the mill may have been what we would consider unpleasant, but it is the only life they have ever known. In the mill, they were probably fed and watered using automatic dispensers, and their feces and urine was only cleaned after it fell through the wire that they lived on. Actual human contact normally came when they were being vaccinated, dewormed, or moved to a new cage to breed or to whelp puppies. Many of the quirks that mill dogs might have will be discovered while the dog is still in our rescue, but there are things that may develop after the dog feels a little more comfortable in your home. Most of the dogs we encounter have had their spirit broken many years before and aggression is not normally something we encounter; however, there are memory triggers that the dog may experience after it is settled in your home, so we will talk briefly about these. The physical contact that they have received probably has not been pleasant. For one thing, because they are not handled enough, they are scared. Many mills handle their "stock" by the scruff of the neck. They have work to do, and don't really want to stand around holding some stinky little dog any longer than necessary. It is not uncommon for these survivors to be sensitive to the backs of their necks, after all, it brings the unexpected. Many mill dogs will try to always face you, not trusting you enough to give you easy access to them from behind. NEVER startle a mill survivor from behind, you will lose any trust that you may have gained. Always make sure that they are anticipating you picking them up and consistently verbally tell them what you are going to do with the same word, like "up". It is not uncommon for a mill dog to drop their bellies to the floor when they know you are going to pick them up, some will even roll on their backs, often urinating in the process. This is a submissive move on the dog's part, and while it may be frustrating trying to pick up a dog in this position, these dogs will seldom show aggression in their lives. It is okay to go ahead and pick up a dog while they are in this position, but if time is not of the essence, encourage the dog to come to you by sitting a few feet away and calling him. The most common posture we see in mill dogs is the "freeze;" the dog will initially try to escape you, but when they realize there is no escape, they simply freeze up--rigid, like a statue--and accept their "fate." This is a good time to really praise the dog--scratch his back or ears and speak gently to him--it goes a long way towards teaching him that human contact can be a good thing. Always be gentle and try to avoid picking them up until you see that they are receptive to it. It's almost a 'hostage' type situation to these dogs. Imagine how you would feel if taken hostage at gunpoint. The gunman may never harm you in any way, but you are aware of the danger the entire time and you don't have the ability to leave when you want. No matter how nice the gunman is to you, you will never enjoy the experience and will always watch for an escape route; however, you can turn the tables around and see a ray of hope. Imagine the gunman has been captured and you decide to visit him in jail. Now you are in control. you call all the shots, you have the ability to leave at any time. The bottom line is that these dogs have to progress at their own pace. Anything you force them to do will not be pleasant to them; let them visit with you on their terms, whenever possible.. Learning about the House:
Many times when you bring a mill survivor into your home, it is their instinct to hide in a quiet corner. Any new dog that you bring into your home should be kept separated from other family pets for 7 days. During this time it is fine to crate or confine them to a quiet area. After that though, they need to have exposure to the household. If crating, the crate should be in a central location. The ideal spot is one where there is frequent walking and activity. This allows the dog to feel safe in the crate, yet observe everyday activity and become accustomed to it; they need to hear the table being set, the dishwasher running, phones ringing, and people talking. Very few mill dogs know what a leash is. After the quarantine, when the dog is out of the crate and supervised, it is not a bad idea to let them drag a leash around with them. Let them get used to the feel. It is easy to fall into the mindset that they must be pampered and carried everywhere, but leash training is important. It will make your life easier to have a leash trained dog, but it will also offer your dog confidence in the future. Gaining Trust:
A mill dog has no reason to trust you. Your trust needs to be earned, little by little. Patience is a very important part of rehabbing a mill survivor. We have seen a lot of mill dogs that don't want to eat whenever people are around. It is important that your mill dog be fed on a schedule, with you near by. You don't have to stand and watch over them but should be in the same room with them. They need to know that their yummy meal is coming from you. For the majority of mill dogs, accepting a treat right out of your hand is a huge show of trust. Offer treats on a regular basis especially as a reward. Don't concern yourself too much if your dog does not eat for a few days. Because most of our mill rescues have been fed with self-feeders and confined to small places, it is not uncommon for them to be a little overweight. If there is no vomiting or diarrhea and your dog is otherwise acting healthy, a few days of nibbling at their food while they learn to live by your schedule, is not going to hurt them. It is important to teach them that food is fed on a schedule and you should not be leaving food down at all times. While you shouldn't overly force yourself upon your dog, it does need to get used to you. Sit and talk quietly while gently petting or massaging your dog. It is best to do this an area where they, not necessarily you , are the most comfortable. They probably won't like it at first, but given them time to adjust. Some dogs sadly, never will adjust, and we'lll talk more about them later. Never allow friends to force attention on a mill survivor. Ask them not to look your dog directly in the eyes. It is not uncommon for mill dogs to simply never accept outsiders. Let your dog set the pace. If the dog approaches, ask them to talk quietly and hold out a hand. No quick movements. Ask that any barking be ignored. Remember that these dogs bark to warn and scare off intruders. If you acknowledge the barking you may be reinforcing it with attention. If you bring your guest outside you have just reinforced to your dog that barking will make the intruder go away. Housebreaking:
A child spends the first one to two years of their life soiling their diaper and having you remove the dirty diaper and replace it with a clean one. A puppy mill dog spends its entire life soiling its living area. Potty training a child and housebreaking a puppy mill dog are the exact same procedures...you are UN-teaching them something that they have already learned to be acceptable. A regular schedule, constant reinforcement, praise, and commitment on your part are a must! Would you ever scream at your child, march them to the bathroom and make them sit on the toilet AFTER you discovered they soiled their diaper? A dog is no different in this sense; scolding them after the deed is done is of no benefit to anyone.
The two most important things you can do are to get your new dog on a regular feeding schedule (which will put them on a regular potty schedule) and to observe them closely after feeding time.
Getting them on a premium, low residue food is very important. This will produce a stool that normally is firm (very easy to clean up) and only one or two bowel movements a day are normal. Low cost, or over the counter foods have a lot of fillers and it is very hard to get a dog on a regular cycle using these foods.
Before you even begin to housebreak them, you must learn their schedule. Most dogs will need to 'go' right after eating. As soon as they are finished eating, command " outside ". Always use the exact same word in the exact same tone. Watch them closely outside and observe their pattern as they prepare to defecate. Some will turn circles, some will scratch at the ground, some may find a corner, some may sniff every inch of the ground, some will get a strange look on their face...every dog is different and you have to learn to recognize how the dog will behave right before he goes; this way you will recognize it when he gets ready to go in the house.
We could give you a million tips that our adopters have found to work best for them, but as we have said, every dog is different. As long as you always keep in mind that housebreaking and potty training are one in the same, you should eventually see results. Never do to a dog what you would not do to a child. It may take a week, it may take a month, it may take a year...and sadly, some dogs will never learn. Never give up and never accept 'accidents' as a way of life. In most cases, the success of housebreaking depends on your commitment. While we have focus mainly on bowel movements, urinating in the house is just as hard to correct as defecating in the house (if not worse). Below we will discuss "marking," which many people associate only with male dogs. We will go into that in more detail, below, but if urinating in the house remains a problem for your dog, we highly recommend crate training. This can be researched online in more detail, but if crate training is not working because your dog is soiling in the crate, you should discontinue the training immediately--as you are only reinforcing that it is okay to soil their area. In general, if you can understand your dog's bowel patterns, you will usually find that they urinate before or after a bowel movement. Reinforce the positive and work on the negative, as most dogs will understand "outside" and associate it with both urinating and defecating. Of course, in the meantime, you will want to protect your carpets by either removing any that can be rolled up, or confining the dog to a tiled floor when you aren't holding it on your lap. This should only be done during the training process, as socialization is just as important as house training and often tiled floors are in areas that we don't spend a lot of time.
Marking:
Puppy mill survivors all have one thing in common...they were all used for breeding. A dog that marks its territory is 'warning' other dogs that this is its area...stay away! However, in a puppy mill situation, the dog's area is normally a 2X4 cage with other dogs in and around their 'territory'. It becomes a constant battle of establishing territory and it is not uncommon to see male and female survivors with marking problems. Normally, marking is seen in dogs with a dominant nature. This is good in the sense that these dogs can normally withstand verbal correction better than submissive dogs. The word 'NO' will become your favorite word as you try to deal with the problem of dogs that mark. Don't be afraid to raise your voice and let the dog know that you are not happy. Always use the exact same word and don't follow 'NO' with "now what has mommy told you about that, you are a bad dog."
Dogs that are marking do not have to potty...taking them outside will not help. You have to teach them that it is not acceptable to do this in the house. The only way to do this is to constantly show your disappointment and stimulate their need to 'dominate' by allowing them more time outside, and even to areas where you know other dogs have been...like the park, or the nearest fire hydrant.
While you and your survivor learn about each other, and your survivor develops a sense of respect towards you, you will have to protect your home from the damage caused by marking. Here are a few tips that you will find helpful.
1. White vinegar is your best friend. Keep a spray bottle handy at all times. Use the vinegar anytime you see your dog mark. The vinegar will neutralize the smell that your dog just left behind. Using other cleaning products may actually cause your dog to mark over the same area again. Most cleaning products contain ammonia...the very scent found in urine. Your dog will feel the need to mark over normal cleaning products, but normally has no interest in areas neutralized by vinegar.
2. Potty Pads....your next best friend. These can be found in any pet store, but most 'housebreaking pads' are treated with ammonia to encourage a puppy to go on the pad instead of the carpet; since we are trying to discourage your dog from marking, these aren't always the best choice. You might check at a home medical supply store. The blue and white pads used to protect beds usually work best. Staple, tape or pin these pads (white side facing outward) to any area that your dog is prone to mark (walls, furniture, etc.). Do not replace the pads when your dog soils them...simply spray them down with vinegar. These are not a solution to the problem, but will help protect your home while you deal with the problem.
3. Scotch Guard. Scotch Guard is really nothing more than a paraffin based protector. It puts a waxy substance down which repels water and spills (and in our case, urine). You can make your own product by filling a spray bottle about 1/2 full of hot water. Shave off slivers of paraffin wax into the bottle (about 1/4 a bar should be fine) and then microwave until you don't see the slivers anymore. Shake and spray this onto the fabric areas you want to protect, such as the base of the sofa and the carpet below doorways or areas your dog is apt to mark. It may make the area stiff feeling at first but it will normally 'blend' in with normal household temperatures and humidity. (note: This is also great for high traffic areas of your home or along the carpet in front of the couch). After the first use, you will need to microwave the bottle and emerge the spray mechanism in a bowl of hot water so that any wax residue will melt.
With the use of vinegar and/or homemade scotch guard, you should test a small area of the fabric/fiber that you will be using the product on and make sure it does not discolor, stain, or bleed. I have never had any problems, but it is always best to check beforehand.
4. Belly Bands. Sometimes these can be a (male) mill dog owners best friend. Belly bands can be easily made at home out of things you probably already have. Depending on the size of your dog you can use the elastic end of your husbands tube socks, the sleeve of sweatshirt, etc. Simply fit the material to your dog and then place a female sanitary napkin under the penis. Another easy way is to measure your dog, cut the fabric and sew on Velcro to hold it in place. There are also many sites on the internet to order these if making them yourself is just not up your alley. Just remember to take the belly band off every time you bring your dog out to potty. Again, this is not a solution, but a protective measure. Quirks:
Poo-poo, shoo-shoo, ca-ca, doo-doo, #2, feces, poop, stool...whatever 'pet' name you give it, it's still gross! But nothing is more gross than owning a dog who eats poop!

Coprophagia is the technical term, but for the purpose of this article, we're just going to call it the 'affliction'.

Dogs of all breeds, ages and sizes have the affliction but in puppy mill rescues, it is not uncommon at all to find dogs afflicted with this horrible habit. As in any bad habit, the cure lies in understanding the unacceptable behavior.

There are three primary reasons that a puppy mill survivor is afflicted. We'll start with the most common, and easiest to remedy.

1. It tastes good and they are hungry! Rescues that have come from a mill where dogs were not fed properly often resort to eating their own or other dog's feces as a source of food. These types of situations will usually remedy themselves when the dog realizes that he is always going to get fed. It is also easy to discourage this behavior by adding over-the-counter products to their food which are manufactured for this purpose. Ask your vet which products are available and you will normally see results in 2-4 weeks.

2. Learned behavior. This is usually the cause of puppy mill dogs that have the affliction. There are several reasons why a dog learned to behave like this, but the most common cause is being housed with dominant dogs who fight over food. These dominant dogs will often guard the food dish and prevent the more submissive dogs from eating even if the dominant dog is not hungry. Food aggression in caged dogs is usually fast and furious and often results in severe injury to the submissive dogs. Because the dominant dog is often eating much more than is needed, the stool is virtually undigested and contains many of the nutrients and 'flavors' of the original meal; therefore almost as tasty to the submissive dog as if he'd ate the real thing. Puppies that were raised with a dominant mother or dominant litter mates also pick up this habit very early--in this case, it is a little harder to treat, but it can usually be done.

This eating pattern is usually maintained throughout the dog's life, so the age of your dog will play a big role in how hard it is to correct the behavior. It's become habit...and as the saying goes, "Old habits are hard to break".

Dogs with the affliction will actually go hunting for a fresh stool when you take them outside. The key is to give your dog something better to hunt for. Pop some unbuttered/unsalted microwave popcorn and sprinkle it on the lawn before taking your dog out in the morning. You may find something that he likes better and is as readily available and affordable. The good thing about popcorn is what your dog doesn't eat, the birds will. We can almost guarantee that once your dog has learned to search out the popcorn, he'll pass those fresh turds right up, LOL! It may take weeks or months before your dog 'unlearns' to seek out stools but most dogs are receptive to this training. You may have to sprinkle the lawn with popcorn the rest of your dog's life...but the trouble is well worth just one 'popcorn kiss' as opposed to a lick on the face right after he eats a tasty turd.

3. As mentioned above, Coprophagia means 'eating poop'. Coprophagia is a form of a much more serious problem called Pica. Pica is the unnatural 'need' to eat foreign objects. Dogs suffering from Pica will eat not only stools, but rocks, dirt, sticks, etc. Remember the kid in school who ate paste and chalk and 'other unspeakables'? Pica is a psychological disorder which is much more in depth and serious than anything we can discuss in this guide.

A good rescuer will observe dogs prior to placement and will recognize the seriousness of this problem. A dog suffering from Pica should never be placed in an inexperienced home or any home that is not aware of the problem and the dangers. Dogs suffering from Pica will often end up having surgery--.often several times--for objects they have eaten that can not be digested. If you are the owner of a dog which you believe suffers from Pica, I suggest you consult your vet; these dogs often require medication for their disorder and only your vet can guide you on the best way to proceed.

Before we close this section on Pica, we want to say that true Pica is rare. Most dogs will chew on sticks or rocks--or sofas and table legs. However a dog suffering from Pica will not just chew on these items...they will eat these items any chance they get. Just because your dog is eating his own stool...and also the bar stool at the kitchen counter...does not mean that he is suffering from Pica. If in doubt, consult your vet. The "special" ones:
Occasionally, we see the survivor who has survived the mill, but at such a great cost that they can never be "brought around". These are the dogs that have endured so much suffering that they remind us of children who are abused, and survive by separating their mind from the body. These damaged dogs will never fully trust anyone. So where does that leave these poor souls? Most are still capable of living out a wonderful life. They need a scheduled environment but most importantly, a home where they are accepted for who and what they are. They may never jump up on a couch and cuddle with you, or bring you a ball to play catch, but you will see the joy that they take in living each day knowing that they will have clean bedding, fresh food and water, and unconditional love. To them, those small comforts alone are pure bliss. These "broken ones" are the ones that normally never leave their foster homes. Ironically, these types of dogs normally do very well in a group-dog setting. They seem to have shunned the world, and most certainly mankind, and have created their own little world without humans. Whenever we suspect that a mill rescue may be "too far gone" for a fast paced family, we try to place them in experienced homes; quiet homes; or homes with other dogs. These are by far the hardest ones for our hearts to accept, but they are also a constant reminder of why we do what we do. The educators: Finding forever homes for mill rescues is not all we do; we are constantly reminded of the horrors of puppy mills and the commercialization/farming of dogs when we see the neglect and abuse these dogs have suffered. We work not only to adopt dogs, but to educate their new owners about the truth behind that puppy in the pet store window. We hope that you will keep a journal or blog on the reform of your puppy mill dog, and we hope that you will join us in our campaign to educate the public--through the eyes of the survivors--by always taking the opportunity to further educate others. Together we have made a difference in the life of just one dog, but together we can also make a difference in the lives of hundreds of thousands of dogs still caged in puppy mills. It is only when the public realizes the connection between pet stores and puppy mills that we will end the demand; end the supply; and end the abuse!